National Guard January 2012 : Page 46

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION NEWS Gen. Craig R. McKinley, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, speaks at a special reception that provided guests with a look at final plans for the museum’s new gallery. A Night for the Museum Donors, officials and Guardsmen get an insider’s look at final plans for the museum’s 9/11 Era Gallery ROM PIECES OF World Trade Center steel to a beekeeper’s helmet to the uniform worn by a fall-en warrior, the artifacts of the National Guard’s last decade have been flowing into the National Guard Educational Foundation (NGEF). They and other items will be put on display soon in the new 9/11 Era Gallery of the National Guard Memorial Mu-seum in Washington, D.C. “We’re about there unless somebody has something that is unique. We can always squeeze that in,” says Cathleen Pearl, the NGEF deputy director. She adds, however, that the inventory lacks items to rep-resent the Guard’s peacekeeping efforts overseas. Also, she’d like to have even broader representation from the expand-ing State Partnership Program. Still, she says, the gallery, which should open in early spring, will provide visitors with a look at what has been a transcendent 10 years for the Guard since events of Sept. 11, 2001. “It will give people that sense of what the Guard is and what the Guard does,” she says. That has been the goal since the initial conception of the 9/11 Era Gallery. The Guard of today is not the Guard of even 11 years ago. Telling the story of that transition will be the gallery’s mission. Gen. Craig R. McKinley, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, touched on that theme in remarks he made Dec. 14 to financial donors (page 47) to the gallery during an eve-ning reception at the National Guard Memorial, the NGAUS headquarters. The event offered a look at artifacts and final plans for the gallery. Sandy Schaeffer (3) F Retired Maj. Gen. Gus L. Hargett Jr. (left) poses for a picture at the reception with Marshall Carlson, the presi-dent of Hendrick Motorsports, and Maj. Gen. Timothy J. Kadavy, the deputy director of the Army National Guard. (From left) Lt. Col. Les’ Melnyk, Sgt. Timothy Abele, Sgt. 1st Class Deborah Garrott, Chief Master Sgt. Reginald Edwards and Command Sgt. Maj. Richard Espinosa hold a piece of steel recovered from the World Trade Center that’s destined for display at the new 9/11 Era Gallery. In the middle is Cathleen Pearl, the NGEF deputy director. 46 | Na tional Guard

Educational Foundation News

Ron Jensen

A Night for the Museum<br /> <br /> Donors, officials and Guardsmen get an insider’s look at final plans for the museum’s 9/11 Era Gallery<br /> <br /> FROM PIECES OF World Trade Center steel to a beekeeper’s helmet to the uniform worn by a fallen warrior, the artifacts of the National Guard’s last decade have been flowing into the National Guard Educational Foundation (NGEF).<br /> <br /> They and other items will be put on display soon in the new 9/11 Era Gallery of the National Guard Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. <br /> <br /> “We’re about there unless somebody has something that is unique. We can always squeeze that in,” says Cathleen Pearl, the NGEF deputy director.<br /> <br /> She adds, however, that the inventory lacks items to represent the Guard’s peacekeeping efforts overseas. Also, she’d like to have even broader representation from the expanding State Partnership Program.<br /> <br /> Still, she says, the gallery, which should open in early spring, will provide visitors with a look at what has been a transcendent 10 years for the Guard since events of Sept. 11, 2001.<br /> <br /> “It will give people that sense of what the Guard is and what the Guard does,” she says.<br /> <br /> That has been the goal since the initial conception of the 9/11 Era Gallery. The Guard of today is not the Guard of even 11 years ago. Telling the story of that transition will be the gallery’s mission.<br /> <br /> Gen. Craig R. McKinley, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, touched on that theme in remarks he made Dec. 14 to financial donors (page 47) to the gallery during an evening reception at the National Guard Memorial, the NGAUS headquarters. The event offered a look at artifacts and final plans for the gallery.<br /> <br /> Invoking Joseph Pfeifer, a fire chief in New York City on 9/11 who spoke at the Guard’s 2011 Joint Senior Leadership Conference in November, McKinley talked about the 102 minutes from the first strike of an airplane into the World Trade Center to the final crash in the attack.<br /> <br /> “Look at how much has changed because of those 102 minutes,” he said to more than 120 people.<br /> <br /> Citing the economy, the way products are shipped, our thoughts about national security and more, McKinley also pointed out that a new generation of veterans had emerged.<br /> <br /> “This new gallery is more than just what the National Guard has done overseas in combat operations,” he said. “It’s about all the things the National Guard has done beyond the battlefield, especially in our communities.” <br /> <br /> In his remarks, retired Maj. Gen. Gus L. Hargett Jr., the president of NGAUS and NGEF, thanked the donors for their contributions and said the night’s event was to show the appreciation of NGAUS.<br /> <br /> “It’s about what you have done for us,” he said.<br /> <br /> The new gallery enables NGEF and NGAUS to better and more completely let the public know what the nation’s National Guard does.<br /> <br /> “What we do here is important when we work the Hill,” he said of the association’s lobbying efforts. “But what we do that is more important is tell the Guard’s story.” <br /> Marshall Carlson, the president of Hendrick Motorsports, which is the largest contributor to the gallery effort, spoke briefly and said the project was “near and dear to our heart and very easy to get behind.” <br /> <br /> “We look forward to many, many more years together,” he said.<br /> <br /> Speaking to the audience at the event, Pearl said she meets people every day who are surprised at all the Guard does. If Americans understand what they are getting back from the Guard, they are more likely to support it.<br /> <br /> She said telling the Guard’s story is linked to the success NGAUS has in Congress acquiring equipment, benefits and more for the Guard.<br /> <br /> “They’ll take care of what they care about,” she said.<br /> <br /> Lonny Schwartz, principal of Designminds, the Fairfax, Va.-based company that is designing the gallery, gave attendees a rough tour of the gallery via an architect’s blueprint, walking them through events on 9/11 to the war on terrorism and beyond, including the domestic missions.<br /> <br /> At the gallery’s center will be a memorial to the nearly 700 Guardsmen who have made the ultimate sacrifice supporting the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.<br /> <br /> Besides artifacts, the gallery will include four video loops addressing 9/11, the war on terrorism, humanitarian missions and the Guard’s work at home.<br /> <br /> Later, he said planning the gallery and working with NGEF taught him about the many missions of the Guard. The gallery should do the same for visitors, he said.<br /> <br /> —By Ron Jensen

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