National Guard May 2011 : Page 54

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION NEWS The National Guard Memorial Mu-seum in Washington, D.C., will under-go a renovation this year to accommo-date a new permanent exhibit. The 9/11 Era Gallery, which will open late in the fall, “will tell the story of the National Guard since Sept. 11,” says Luke Guthrie, the NGAUS director of development and membership services. The museum is located in the Na-tional Guard Memorial, NGAUS head-quarters in Washington, D.C. It is operated by the National Guard Edu-cational Foundation. The exhibit will include the Guard’s immediate response to the terrorist at-tacks, its role in subsequent overseas operations and its involvement in do-mestic emergencies since then, pri-marily Hurricane Katrina, which saw 50,000 Guardsmen mobilized in 2005. A centerpiece of the exhibit, which will include a memorial to more than 650 Guardsmen who have died fight-ing in the war on terrorism, will be a piece of steel from the World Trade Center and a piece of the Pentagon wall that was broken that day. Numerous photographs will also enhance the gallery, as well as artifacts New Museum Exhibit to Feature Guard Since 9/11 provided by men and women of the Guard. Cathleen Pearl, the deputy director of NGEF , says, “We want to show the Guard on the ground and in the air, the Guard as first responders.” Pearl says one exhibit will show visitors all of the gear worn in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan. “We want people to get a feel for what it’s like to be a deployed Guards-man,” she says. But, she says, the exhibit must provide a glimpse of the multifacted Guard mission. She says it will show-case efforts such as the agricultural development teams in Afghanistan, the State Partnership Program and hu-manitarian missions in Haiti and Paki-stan, plus more. Pearl encourages Guard soldiers and airmen to offer up any item for the exhibit that helps tell the story of the Guard’s past 10 years, from medi-cal kits used to save lives in combat to crates that held apples grown in an Af-ghan orchard. Anything that would educate the public, she says, is fair game for the museum exhibit. Ron Jensen ( From left ) First Lt. Cy W. Rice, 1st Lt. Todd Hostetler and Capt. Andrew Bockmeyer look at some steel from the World Trade Center during an Indiana National Guard visit to the National Guard Memorial last month. NGEF hopes to raise $250,000 for the renovation. Information about the exhibit and how to become a donor can be found at www.ngef.org/the911eragallery. Scholarship Program to Help Children of Fallen Guardsmen College-bound children of National Guardsmen who have lost their lives in the war on ter-rorism can now apply for up to $25,000 in scholarship funds from DRS Technolo-gies, a New Jersey-based defense contractor. The DRS Guardian Schol-arship Fund will be administered by the National Guard Educational Foundation. The first awards will be made in time for the fall semester this year. Students will receive up to $6,250 per year for four years if they attend a four-year institution. For those attending a two-year program at a community college or technical school, the scholarship will provide up to $6,250 for both years. Rich Goldberg, the DRS senior vice president of public affairs and communication, said the idea grew from his time on the NGEF board, which he joined within the past year as the board’s nonmilitary member. “I’ve gotten a good education about what the Guard is and how it operates,” he said. He also learned of the ultimate sacrifice of more than 650 Guards-men in the war on terror. Goldberg, who is also president of the DRS Charitable Foundation, has helped give millions of dollars to charities, including the USO and the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund. “We started asking the question, ‘What about the children of the 650 [Guardsmen]?’” he said. The idea became the scholar-ship fund, which will be ongoing. The adjutants general of the 54 states and territories will be asked to assist in identifying families with children who qualify. High school juniors and seniors, as well as those students already in college, are eligible. A panel created by NGEF will review the ap-plications and determine recipients. A video about the program and an explanation of how to donate to the fund can be seen at www. drsfoundation.net/guard. 54 | Na tional Guard

Educational Foundation News

New Museum Exhibit to Feature Guard Since 9/11<br /> <br /> The National Guard Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., will undergo a renovation this year to accommodate a new permanent exhibit.<br /> <br /> The 9/11 Era Gallery, which will open late in the fall, "will tell the story of the National Guard since Sept. 11," says Luke Guthrie, the NGAUS director of development and membership services.<br /> <br /> The museum is located in the National Guard Memorial, NGAUS headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is operated by the National Guard Educational Foundation.<br /> <br /> The exhibit will include the Guard's immediate response to the terrorist attacks, its role in subsequent overseas operations and its involvement in domestic emergencies since then, primarily Hurricane Katrina, which saw 50,000 Guardsmen mobilized in 2005.<br /> <br /> A centerpiece of the exhibit, which will include a memorial to more than 650 Guardsmen who have died fighting in the war on terrorism, will be a piece of steel from the World Trade Center and a piece of the Pentagon wall that was broken that day.<br /> <br /> Numerous photographs will also enhance the gallery, as well as artifacts provided by men and women of the Guard.<br /> <br /> Cathleen Pearl, the deputy director of NGEF, says, "We want to show the Guard on the ground and in the air, the Guard as first responders."<br /> <br /> Pearl says one exhibit will show visitors all of the gear worn in the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan.<br /> <br /> "We want people to get a feel for what it's like to be a deployed Guardsman," she says.<br /> <br /> But, she says, the exhibit must provide a glimpse of the multifacted Guard mission. She says it will showcase efforts such as the agricultural development teams in Afghanistan, the State Partnership Program and humanitarian missions in Haiti and Pakistan, plus more.<br /> <br /> Pearl encourages Guard soldiers and airmen to offer up any item for the exhibit that helps tell the story of the Guard's past 10 years, from medical kits used to save lives in combat to crates that held apples grown in an Afghan orchard.<br /> <br /> Anything that would educate the public, she says, is fair game for the museum exhibit. NGEF hopes to raise $250,000 for the renovation.<br /> <br /> Information about the exhibit and how to become a donor can be found at www.ngef.org/the911eragallery.<br /> <br /> Scholarship Program to Help Children of Fallen Guardsmen<br /> <br /> College-bound children of National Guardsmen who have lost their lives in the war on terrorism can now apply for up to $25,000 in scholarship funds from DRS Technologies, a New Jersey-based defense contractor.<br /> <br /> The DRS Guardian Scholarship Fund will be administered by the National Guard Educational Foundation. The first awards will be made in time for the fall semester this year.<br /> <br /> Students will receive up to $6,250 per year for four years if they attend a four-year institution. For those attending a two-year program at a community college or technical school, the scholarship will provide up to $6,250 for both years.<br /> <br /> Rich Goldberg, the DRS senior vice president of public affairs and communication, said the idea grew from his time on the NGEF board, which he joined within the past year as the board's nonmilitary member. "I've gotten a good education about what the Guard is and how it operates," he said.<br /> <br /> He also learned of the ultimate sacrifice of more than 650 Guardsmen in the war on terror. Goldberg, who is also president of the DRS Charitable Foundation, has helped give millions of dollars to charities, including the USO and the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund.<br /> <br /> "We started asking the question, 'What about the children of the 650 [Guardsmen]?'" he said.<br /> <br /> The idea became the scholarship fund, which will be ongoing. The adjutants general of the 54 states and territories will be asked to assist in identifying families with children who qualify.<br /> <br /> High school juniors and seniors, as well as those students already in college, are eligible. A panel created by NGEF will review the applications and determine recipients.<br /> <br /> A video about the program and an explanation of how to donate to the fund can be seen at www.drsfoundation.net/guard.

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