National Guard March 2011 : Page 48

ASSOCIATION NEWS Nominees Sought for 2011 Individual Awards Do you work with someone with a long record of outstand-ing military service? Has your elected representative been a strong Guard sup-porter? Do you know of a Guardsman who has performed a life-saving act? If so, these individ-Distinguished Service Medal uals are candidates for NGAUS recognition. The association is seeking nomina-tions for its 2011 NGAUS Individual Awards Program. Nominees should have demonstrated superior perfor-mance, committed acts of heroism or have contributed significantly to Guard effectiveness. There are 12 separate individual awards, including a new category this year for outstanding warrant officers. Complete awards program informa-tion was mailed last month to each state and territory joint force head-quarters and state and territory Guard association. Award program basics are also available at www.ngaus.org/ awards. Nominations must be submitted by May 15, and most must have an adju-tant general endorsement. The only ex-ceptions are submissions directly from the state and territory associations. A five-person awards committee will review the nominees in June and make recommendations to the NGAUS board for final approval in July. Awards will be presented during business sessions of the 133rd NGAUS General Conference and Exhibition, Aug. 27 to 29 in Milwaukee ( Conference preview, page 32 ). Nominations for Army Guard and Air Guard unit awards presented at the conference must be submitted through the National Guard Bureau. They have different submission procedures and deadlines Treasurer, Staffer Bear Witness to Revolution Retired Brig. Gen. Ken Ross, the NGAUS treasurer, and members of his family, including Dixie Ross of the NGAUS staff, bumped into a political revolution on their recent vacation. The four family members were in Egypt last month to see ancient treasures, but they got sidetracked slightly by the massive protests that eventually removed president Hosni Mubarak from power. Dixie Ross, a NGAUS legislative analyst, along with her father, her mother, Linda, and her sister, Megan, had the trip planned for months and arrived in Egypt days before any protestors took to the streets. During a two-day sight-seeing jaunt to Jordan, they heard that Tuni-sia’s ruling party was forced to resign by protestors. That gave her family cause for concern, Dixie said, but they returned to Egypt for a cruise on the Nile River to Luxor, the location of the famous Valley of the Kings. By the time the family reached Luxor, the protests were in full swing. The tour company in charge of the trip put all of its guests in a hotel that Board of Directors To Meet This Month Maj. Gen. Frank Vavala, the NGAUS chairman, will convene the first NGAUS board of directors meeting of the year March 12 at the National Guard Memorial, the association head-quarters in Washington, D.C. The weekend-long meeting agenda includes discussion of the current leg-islative session and the president’s fis-cal 2012 defense budget request, and an update from senior National Guard Bureau officers. Membership, marketing and plans for the 133rd NGAUS General Con-ference and Exhibition, scheduled for Aug. 27 to 29 in Milwaukee, also will be on the schedule. Events begin March 11 with the meetings of the company-grade, gen-eral conference, officer professional development and warrant officer com-mittees. The 29-member board is the asso-ciation’s governing body. Its members are elected by delegates to the annual conference and serve staggered two-and three-year terms. The NGAUS-Insurance Trust and the National Guard Educational Foun-dation boards also meet March 11 and will report to the association board over the weekend. Retired Brig. Gen. Ken Ross Dixie Ross was on full lockdown each night. “It was quiet throughout the days,” Dixie said. “At night, after evening prayers, you could hear the protests, but never see them.” Hotel guests ventured out during the day, and she said she spoke with Egyptians who were glad that foreign-ers were there to witness the change. “They talked about how frustrat-ing it is that such a small segment of [the population] holds so much of the wealth,” Dixie said. “They really wanted to tell their side of the story.” After a couple days in Luxor, the family headed back to the Cairo airport, which was flooded with foreigners attempting to leave the country. While they did miss their scheduled flight home, they were able to catch another one a day later without incident. 48 | Na tional Guard

Association News

Nominees Sought for 2011 Individual Awards<br /> <br /> Do you work with someone with a long record of outstanding military service? Has your elected representative been a strong Guard supporter? Do you know of a Guardsman who has performed a lifesaving act?<br /> <br /> If so, these individuals are candidates for NGAUS recognition. The association is seeking nominations for its 2011 NGAUS Individual Awards Program. Nominees should have demonstrated superior performance, committed acts of heroism or have contributed significantly to Guard effectiveness.<br /> <br /> There are 12 separate individual awards, including a new category this year for outstanding warrant officers. Complete awards program information was mailed last month to each state and territory joint force headquarters and state and territory Guard association. Award program basics are also available at www.ngaus.org/ awards.<br /> <br /> Nominations must be submitted by May 15, and most must have an adjutant general endorsement. The only exceptions are submissions directly from the state and territory associations.<br /> <br /> A five-person awards committee will review the nominees in June and make recommendations to the NGAUS board for final approval in July.<br /> <br /> Awards will be presented during business sessions of the 133rd NGAUS General Conference and Exhibition, Aug. 27 to 29 in Milwaukee (Conference preview, page 32).<br /> <br /> Nominations for Army Guard and Air Guard unit awards presented at the conference must be submitted through the National Guard Bureau. They have different submission procedures and deadlines.<br /> <br /> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> Board of Directors To Meet This Month<br /> <br /> Maj. Gen. Frank Vavala, the NGAUS chairman, will convene the first NGAUS board of directors meeting of the year March 12 at the National Guard Memorial, the association headquarters in Washington, D.C.<br /> <br /> The weekend-long meeting agenda includes discussion of the current legislative session and the president's fiscal 2012 defense budget request, and an update from senior National Guard Bureau officers.<br /> <br /> Membership, marketing and plans for the 133rd NGAUS General Conference and Exhibition, scheduled for Aug. 27 to 29 in Milwaukee, also will be on the schedule.<br /> <br /> Events begin March 11 with the meetings of the company-grade, general conference, officer professional development and warrant officer committees.<br /> <br /> The 29-member board is the association's governing body. Its members are elected by delegates to the annual conference and serve staggered twoand three-year terms.<br /> <br /> The NGAUS-Insurance Trust and the National Guard Educational Foundation boards also meet March 11 and will report to the association board over the weekend.<br /> <br /> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> Treasurer, Staffer Bear Witness to Revolution<br /> <br /> Retired Brig. Gen. Ken Ross, the NGAUS treasurer, and members of his family, including Dixie Ross of the NGAUS staff, bumped into a political revolution on their recent vacation.<br /> <br /> The four family members were in Egypt last month to see ancient treasures, but they got sidetracked slightly by the massive protests that eventually removed president Hosni Mubarak from power.<br /> <br /> Dixie Ross, a NGAUS legislative analyst, along with her father, her mother, Linda, and her sister, Megan, had the trip planned for months and arrived in Egypt days before any protestors took to the streets. During a two-day sight-seeing jaunt to Jordan, they heard that Tunisia's ruling party was forced to resign by protestors.<br /> <br /> That gave her family cause for concern, Dixie said, but they returned to Egypt for a cruise on the Nile River to Luxor, the location of the famous Valley of the Kings.<br /> <br /> By the time the family reached Luxor, the protests were in full swing. The tour company in charge of the trip put all of its guests in a hotel that was on full lockdown each night.<br /> <br /> "It was quiet throughout the days," Dixie said. "At night, after evening prayers, you could hear the protests, but never see them."<br /> <br /> Hotel guests ventured out during the day, and she said she spoke with Egyptians who were glad that foreigners were there to witness the change.<br /> <br /> "They talked about how frustrating it is that such a small segment of [the population] holds so much of the wealth," Dixie said. "They really wanted to tell their side of the story."<br /> <br /> After a couple days in Luxor, the family headed back to the Cairo airport, which was flooded with foreigners attempting to leave the country. While they did miss their scheduled flight home, they were able to catch another one a day later without incident.

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