National Guard November 2012 : Page 18

NEWSBREAKS Guardsmen in Several States Respond to Hurricane Sandy About 12,000 National Guardsmen were on duty in 11 states Oct. 30, the day Hurricane Sandy rolled through states along the eastern seaboard and the District of Columbia, according to the National Guard Bureau. Guard assistance to local first re-sponders and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) included support at evacuation shelters, route clearance, search-and-rescue and deliv-ery of essential equipment and supplies. The focus of Guard missions quick-ly shifted to recovery in the aftermath of the storm. The governors of 12 states and the mayor of the District of Columbia had declared states of emergency because of the storm, which was downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone as it made its way further inland and continued to wreak havoc. The states included Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia. Guardsmen were assembling and staging in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hamp-shire, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island and Virginia, according to the National Guard Coordination Center, which monitored the response spearheaded by the states. In Connecticut, Guardsmen re-sponded to evacuation security support and high-wheeled, search-and-rescue missions. High-wheeled vehicles supported civilian authorities in Maryland. In Massachusetts, a civil support team was on stand-by for a possible hazardous materials response. In New Jersey, Guardsmen assisted state police. In New York and Pennsylvania, they assisted state emergency managers. In Virginia, Guardsmen assisted with de-bris removal. Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, briefed Presi-dent Barack Obama on the Guard re-sponse in support of state, local and federal agencies as part of a FEMA briefing the day before the storm made landfall. Grass was in dawn-to-dusk meetings the next day with senior Guard leaders, FEMA officials, adjutants general and the secretary of defense, among others, to monitor and respond to the storm that affected millions of Americans. “We had to be ready to respond big and fast, so the National Guard ramped up in multiple states this weekend preparing to support local, state and federal civilian authorities,” Grass said. “We are part of a whole-of-government response to support state, local and federal agencies tackling the effects of this storm.” or extremist group could gain control of critical switches and derail passen-ger trains or trains loaded with lethal chemicals. They could contaminate the water supply in major cities or shut down the power grid across large parts of the country.” He said the Defense Department has a supporting role in cyber defense to the Department of Homeland Secu-rity. But, he added, the DoD mission is to defend America. He said the Pentagon is finalizing a change in rules for engagement in cy-berspace. “The new rules will make clear that the department has a responsibility not only to defend DoD’s network, but also to be prepared to defend the na-tion and our national interests against an attack in or through cyberspace,” he said. “These new rules will make the department more agile and provide us with the ability to confront major threats quickly.” He said Congress must take action, but noted that a bipartisan piece of leg-islation known as the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 “has fallen victim to legis-lative and political gridlock. That is un-acceptable to me, and it should be un-acceptable to anyone concerned with safeguarding our national security.” Responding to the speech by Panet-ta, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., the Senate majority leader, said he would bring the legislation to a vote after lawmakers return from their pre-election recess. “Secretary Panetta’s warnings are consistent with the message that the national security community has been delivering to the Senate for months,” he said. Panetta Sounds Alarm Over Acute Dangers of Cyberattack A cyberattack on America could be as destructive as 9/11, the defense secre-tary told a business group last month in New York. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said, “Such a destructive cyber terrorist attack could paralyze the nation.” Speaking to the Business Execu-tives for National Security meeting on Oct. 11, he said, “An aggressor nation National Guard Casualties Three Army National Guard soldiers lost their lives from Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 while supporting overseas contingency opera-tions, according to Defense Department casualty reporting. r 4HU&#0f;5IPNBT+&#0f;#VUMFS*7 , 25, of Wilmington, N.C., 4HU&#0f;+FS -emy F. Hardison, 23, of Maysville, N.C., and Sgt. Donna 3&#0f;+PIOTPO , 29, of Raeford, N.C., died Oct.1, in Khost, Af-18 ghanistan, while on a dismounted patrol when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest filled with explosives. All three were members of North Carolina Army National Guard’s 514th Military Police Company, 60th Troop Com-mand, from Winterville, N.C. | Na tional Guard

Newsbreaks

Guardsmen in Several States Respond to Hurricane Sandy<br /> <br /> About 12,000 National Guardsmen were on duty in 11 states Oct. 30, the day Hurricane Sandy rolled through states along the eastern seaboard and the District of Columbia, according to the National Guard Bureau.<br /> <br /> Guard assistance to local first responders and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) included support at evacuation shelters, route clearance, search-and-rescue and delivery of essential equipment and supplies.<br /> <br /> The focus of Guard missions quickly shifted to recovery in the aftermath of the storm.<br /> <br /> The governors of 12 states and the mayor of the District of Columbia had declared states of emergency because of the storm, which was downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone as it made its way further inland and continued to wreak havoc.<br /> <br /> The states included Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia.<br /> <br /> Guardsmen were assembling and staging in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island and Virginia, according to the National Guard Coordination Center, which monitored the response spearheaded by the states.<br /> <br /> In Connecticut, Guardsmen responded to evacuation security support and high-wheeled, searchand- rescue missions. High-wheeled vehicles supported civilian authorities in Maryland. In Massachusetts, a civil support team was on stand-by for a possible hazardous materials response. In New Jersey, Guardsmen assisted state police.<br /> <br /> In New York and Pennsylvania, they assisted state emergency managers. In Virginia, Guardsmen assisted with debris removal.<br /> <br /> Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, briefed President Barack Obama on the Guard response in support of state, local and federal agencies as part of a FEMA briefing the day before the storm made landfall.<br /> <br /> Grass was in dawn-to-dusk meetings the next day with senior Guard leaders, FEMA officials, adjutants general and the secretary of defense, among others, to monitor and respond to the storm that affected millions of Americans.<br /> <br /> "We had to be ready to respond big and fast, so the National Guard ramped up in multiple states this weekend preparing to support local, state and federal civilian authorities," Grass said. "We are part of a whole-ofgovernment response to support state, local and federal agencies tackling the effects of this storm."<br /> <br /> Panetta Sounds Alarm Over Acute Dangers of Cyberattack<br /> <br /> A cyberattack on America could be as destructive as 9/11, the defense secretary told a business group last month in New York.<br /> <br /> Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said, "Such a destructive cyber terrorist attack could paralyze the nation."<br /> <br /> Speaking to the Business Executives for National Security meeting on Oct. 11, he said, "An aggressor nation or extremist group could gain control of critical switches and derail passenger trains or trains loaded with lethal chemicals. They could contaminate the water supply in major cities or shut down the power grid across large parts of the country."<br /> <br /> He said the Defense Department has a supporting role in cyber defense to the Department of Homeland Security. But, he added, the DoD mission is to defend America.<br /> <br /> He said the Pentagon is finalizing a change in rules for engagement in cyberspace.<br /> <br /> "The new rules will make clear that the department has a responsibility not only to defend DoD's network, but also to be prepared to defend the nation and our national interests against an attack in or through cyberspace," he said. "These new rules will make the department more agile and provide us with the ability to confront major threats quickly."<br /> <br /> He said Congress must take action, but noted that a bipartisan piece of legislation known as the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 "has fallen victim to legislative and political gridlock. That is unacceptable to me, and it should be unacceptable to anyone concerned with safeguarding our national security."<br /> <br /> Responding to the speech by Panetta, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., the Senate majority leader, said he would bring the legislation to a vote after lawmakers return from their pre-election recess.<br /> <br /> "Secretary Panetta's warnings are consistent with the message that the national security community has been delivering to the Senate for months," he said.<br /> <br /> 'Outstanding Leader' Witham Named ANG Deputy Director<br /> <br /> Brig. Gen. James C. "JC" Witham has been named the deputy director of the Air National Guard. Witham had served as the chief of staff of the California National Guard and the commander of that state's Air National Guard.<br /> <br /> "I am thrilled and humbled for the opportunity to lead the best Air National Guard in our nation's history, a force that is proven in combat and domestic crises," Witham said. "I look forward to ensuring the investment the American people have made in the Air Guard continues to pay dividends."<br /> <br /> As deputy director, Witham will be part of the leadership team responsible for formulating, developing and coordinating all policies, plans and programs.<br /> <br /> Lt. Gen. Harry "Bud" Wyatt III, the Air Guard director, said Witham is the right person at the right time.<br /> <br /> "JC is an outstanding leader and we're glad to have him on our team," Wyatt said. "His wealth of command and staff positions will help shape and guide the Air Guard as we forge ahead to the future."<br /> <br /> Witham is no stranger to key Pentagon and leadership positions. He has served at the National Guard Bureau as the director of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and as the director of air, space and information operations.<br /> <br /> As the California Air Guard's commander, he was responsible for command and control oversight of five major field-level organizations comprised of nearly 4,700 military and civilian personnel serving at 10 locations.<br /> <br /> Witham also was nominated for appointment to the rank of major general. The nomination is pending Senate confirmation.<br /> <br /> McHugh: Guard, Reserve Critical to Army's Future<br /> <br /> The continued integration of the National Guard and Reserve is a critical component of the Army's future, the civilian head of the Army said last month.<br /> <br /> Speaking before the opening session of the 2012 Association of the United States Army Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C., Army Secretary John M. McHugh said the Army has learned the importance of an operational reserve component in meeting mission requirements over the last 11 years.<br /> <br /> Continued training and readiness of the reserve components is "paramount to the Army's overall readiness and stability, and our nation's security," McHugh said. "We are going to make sure we do that, and we do it right."<br /> <br /> Part of the Army's eff ort in that direction includes a McHugh-signed directive that establishes a "Total Force policy" for the Army. That directive says The Army will man, train, and equip active and reserve components "in an integrated operational force," the purpose of which is to provide "predictable, recurring, and sustainable capabilities."<br /> <br /> McHugh said the directive outlines a number of measures to make integration of those forces seamless.<br /> <br /> Some of those measures include uniform processes and procedures for validating pre-deployment readiness; developing and implementing unified personnel management and pay systems; ensuring that equipping strategies promote procurement programs for a total force; and facilitating opportunities for soldiers to move between active- and reserve-component assignments throughout their career.<br /> <br /> Report Says Total Force<br /> <br /> Policy Best Approach for Air Force In order to better accomplish its core missions, the Air Force needs to recommit to the Total Force, according to a special report issued last month by the Heritage Foundation, a pro-defense think tank in Washington, D.C.<br /> <br /> The recommendation is part of "Full-Spectrum Air Power: Building the Air Force America Needs" by Robert P. Haffa, a retired Air Force pilot and Air Force Academy professor who now heads Haffa Defense Consulting in Naples, Fla.<br /> <br /> He argues for rebuilding the Air Force to support a joint force capable of meeting current and future threats "without regard to arbitrary fiscal guidelines and ceilings."<br /> <br /> Haffa says budgetary decisions and more than 20 years of continuous asymmetric operations have the Air Force ill-equipped to carry out its roles and missions in the new national military strategy, including air superiority and long-range strike.<br /> <br /> To reverse this trend, he offers several recommendations, including reopening the F-22 assembly line, building a new long-range bomber, acquiring new F-15s and F-16s from active production lines, reversing the C-27J decision and recommitting to the Total Force.<br /> <br /> "Modernization of the Guard and Reserve is essential to enhance recruitment and retention and to keep ready the expertise generated during constant rotations to Iraq and Afghanistan," he wrote.<br /> <br /> Effort to Stem Sexual Assault Draws Praise from Lawmakers<br /> <br /> The Pentagon is on the right track in its effort to reduce sexual assault in the military, lawmakers told POLITCO last month.<br /> <br /> The elected officials were buoyed by the appointment of Maj. Gen. Gary Patton to take over the Sexual Assault Prevention Response Office.<br /> <br /> "What I saw upfront is we recognize that we have a problem with sexual assault in the military," Patton told the publication. "There is no silver bullet in terms of solving this issue. It really comes down to a combination of programs."<br /> <br /> Patton led the military's effort to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy. His appointment is seen as a step in the right direction in Congress to battle the runaway problem. Although 2,723 sexual assaults were reported last year, the Defense Department estimates about 19,000 occurred.<br /> <br /> "We see in upper leadership … the beginning of some real accountability both in prevention, protection of victims and prosecution," said Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio. "Congress is really looking very closely to see whether or not their efforts can lead to real turnaround."<br /> <br /> Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., told the Capitol Hill newspaper, "We . . . Need a drumbeat of leadership coming across the highest military chain of command, so the [defense] secretary's leadership and a new SAPRO commander are important steps in that direction.<br /> <br /> "But more needs to be done to ensure that there is no tolerance for sexual assault and there is appropriate prevention, punishment and service for victims."<br /> <br /> NGB Diversity Council Honored As One of Nation's 25 Best<br /> <br /> The National Guard Bureau's Joint Diversity Executive Council was recognized as one of the top 25 diversity councils in the country by the Association of Diversity Councils last month.<br /> <br /> "I couldn't be more proud of our Joint Diversity Executive Council being recognized this year," said Lt. Gen. Joseph Lengyel, the vice chief of the National Guard Bureau.<br /> <br /> The JDEC placed 14th for outstanding contributions and achievement that lead organizational diversity processes, according to the Association of Diversity Councils.<br /> <br /> "Diversity is important to the National Guard simply because it makes us better," Lengyel said. "And, in today's Military forces, we simply must leverage every advantage to be the best.<br /> <br /> Under the guidance and direction of the NGB chief, the JDEC, chaired by Brig. Gen. William Burks, the Nevada adjutant general, provides strategic policies and procedures with the objective of operationalizing diversity throughout the National Guard.<br /> <br /> In its fourth year, the Diversity Council Honors Award recognizes and awards the outstanding contributions and achievements of diversity council groups that lead organizational diversity processes and demonstrate results in their workforce, workplace and marketplace.<br /> <br /> According to the NGB diversity policy, diversity includes differences in character-istics, background, attributes and experi-ences. However, further expansion is es-sential to create a culture that fosters:<br /> <br /> . Absolute respect for all people no matter their rank, function or position;<br /> <br /> . Inclusion, engagement and management of talents to capitalize the potential power;<br /> <br /> . Diversity in thoughts, ideas and perspec-tives to promote moral courage and trust;<br /> <br /> . Confidence in equal opportunity for all; and<br /> <br /> . An independent mindset where collabo-ration is the standard.<br /> <br /> McKinley Returns to Florida To End Historic Guard Career <br /> <br /> Gen. Craig R. McKinley spent the past 14 years serving in the nations capital, but returned home to northeast Florida last month to retire from his nearly 40-year military career with the people he served with the longest.<br /> <br /> Flanked by his friends, family and peers, McKinley received the Governors Medal of Merit from Florida Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cross from the Florida adjutant general, Maj. Gen. Emmett R. Titshawjr., during a formal retreat ceremony on the parade field of the historic St. Francis Bar-racks in St. Augustine.<br /> <br /> McKinley, a Florida National Guardsman, made history this year when he became the first Guardsman to serve as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He was also the first Guardsman to head the National Guard Bureau as a four-star general.<br /> <br /> The elevation of the NGB chief to a seat on the Joint Chiefs of Staff was a significant step in recognizing the importance of the Guard to the safety and security of the na-tion.<br /> <br /> McKinley received his commission in 1974 as a distinguished graduate of the ROTC program at Southern Methodist University He joined the Florida National Guard in 1980 as a T-23 and F-106 alert pilot. He has served in numerous assignments in flying and operations, as well as command positions at group, wing, sector And field operating agency levels.<br /> <br /> The day held mixed feelings for McKin- ley.<br /> <br /> "It's a tough day, its a bittersweet moment,v said McKinley. "But all of us know when we put on the uniform there will come a day when we have to say goodbye. Todays that day for me and I couldn't have been more proud to be here/' <br /> <br /> McKinley is now the president of the Air Force Association.<br /> <br /> New Pentagon Plan Limits TRICARE Prime Coverage <br /> <br /> Many TRICARE Prime policy holders in Iowa, Minnesota and Oregon, as well as in Reno, Nev., and Springfield, Mo., will lose benefits associated with that program in April.<br /> <br /> They will likely shift to TRICARE Standard which requires greater out-of-pocket costs than Prime.<br /> <br /> Army Times reported the change last month. The Pentagon would not confirm the areas affected, but a source told the newspaper it included those three states and two cities.<br /> <br /> As many as 30,000 beneficiaries will be aflected, the newspaper reported.<br /> <br /> Pete Duffy, the NGAUS acting legislative director, said the move is "not in the best interests of our members and their families who will lose that coverage."<br /> <br /> "This is another Pentagon cost-saving effort placed upon the backs of our members and their families," he said.<br /> <br /> New regional contracts awarded by the Pentagon take effect April 1. The TRICARE West region will be under contract with United Health Federal Services, which was awarded the con- tract once held by TriWest Healthcare Alliance.<br /> <br /> Under the contract, TRICARE Prime will be limited only to a 40-mile radius around military bases. This move saves money for the Pentagon by reducing contract administration costs and shifting costs of care to beneficiaries.<br /> <br /> Get more National Guard news by signing up for Washington Report, a weekly e-newsletter, at www.ngaus.org<br /> <br /> ROUGH CUT "Its most likely the last impression the family will have of the military. We don't want the last thing a family thinks is we didn't take care of their family member."<br /> <br /> - Staff Sgt. Marvin Barbee, coordinator, Oklahoma National Guard's funeral honors program, "Honoring with Pride: Funding falls for honor guardTulsa World, Oct. 7<br /> <br /> CHAMPAGNE TASTE "We tend to want everything to be Lamborghinis, when the truth is that there are a lot of good solid Fords that would do the job."<br /> <br /> - Michele Flournoy, former undersecretary of defense for policy; "Former Defense Official Calls Congressional Paralysis A Threat," GovExec.com, Oct. 17<br /> <br /> WAKE-UP CALL "The whole point of this is that we simply don't just sit back and wait for a goddamn crisis to happen. In this country we tend to do that, and that's a concern."<br /> <br /> - Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, "Panetta Sounds Alarm on Cyber-War Threat," Time.com, Oct. 12<br /> <br /> MATTER OF LEADERSHIP "I don't see this as necessarily a female issue. This is a leadership issue. Its about enforcing standards of behavior. Ever)' sexual assault is an affront to military values."<br /> <br /> - Maj. Gen. Gary S. Patton, director, Pentagon Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, "DoD Says It's At Turning Point In Sexual Assault Battle," POLITICOPro.com, Oct. 16<br /> <br /> WAR FATIGUE "[Americans] definitely think the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were not worth the cost. They don't think we are any safer today from terrorism because of the wars, and they generally prefer to address delicate situations with diplomacy rather than military action."<br /> <br /> - Dina Smeltz, study director, Chicago Council on Global Affairs, "Survey Paints Picture Of War-Weary America," Chicago Tribune, Oct. 16<br /> <br /> DEBT OF GRATITUDE "Many of us don't understand, I think, what it means to be an American, to live in the U.S. How do you give back? Military service is the way I chose."<br /> <br /> - Command Sgt. Maj. Rafael Conde, Wisconsin Army National Guard, "Cuba native takes pride in Guard service," Wisconsin National Guard release, Oct. 18<br /> <br /> The Defense Debate: 1972<br /> <br /> Senator George McGovern, the Democratic candidate for President, has made defense one of the major issues of the 1972 election with his controversial proposal for cutting the Pentagon Budget by $30 billion within the next two years. ... <br /> <br /> He calls it: "Toward a More Secure America: An Alternative National Defense Posture."<br /> <br /> There should be no gain saying the fact that Sen. McGovern is offering the American people an alternative-an unmistakable one-with his newly packaged versions of the old "bigger-bang-for-a-buck" promise. But there is a serious question as to whether his $54.8 billion Defense Budget for Fiscal 1975 would gain more security for the United States.<br /> <br /> Mr Nixon's Budget for FY '73, if figured in 1975 dollars, would total $84 billion. On the other hand, Sen. McGovern's $54.8 billion in 1972 dollars would be worth less than $50 billion.<br /> <br /> Given the winding-down of the war in Viet Nam and the domestic pressure on the Government to put new emphasis (money) on the solution of health, education, welfare and pollution problems, the 35% cut the Senator seeks may not appear to be quite so staggering or risky as it really is.<br /> <br /> But often overlooked by the anti-defense coalition, in Congress and out, is that Sen. McGovern's assault on military spending would come on top of record-breaking cuts already made by Mr. Nixon.... <br /> <br /> Pentagon spending has been cut by 30% in the past few years, from $78 billion to $54 billion in constant 1968 dollars, and real purchases from industry have been slashed by 40%. As a result, military manpower has dropped from 3.4 million to under 2.4 million-the lowest total since 1951. In addition, 1.3 million defense-related jobs have been eliminated.... <br /> <br /> Obviously, a reduction of $30 billion in the Budget would impact heavily and adversely on the Regular and National Guard and other Reserve Forces alike. ...<br /> <br /> The Senator projects overall Armed Forces of only 1,735,000 personnel-less than half the number fielded by the Soviet Union and 65,000 fewer than our pre-Pearl Harbor strength of 1.8 million men in June, 1941. The current Nixon plan is for 2,358,000 by next June 30<br /> <br /> Did You Know?<br /> <br /> The term "National Guard" was first adopted by a New York militia unit in 1825 to honor the Marquis de Lafayette, hero of the American Revolution and former commander of la Garde Nationale de Paris during the French Revolution.<br /> Source: National Guard Educational Foundation

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